Sam Crawford

 

Here's a quote from an old 'Sporting News Article', 'Tales of Sam's slugging prowess are endless. When 'League Park' was built in Cleveland, a 45-foot- high screen was erected atop the right field wall as a deterrent to Crawford's clouts. Sam paid little heed. He simply lofted drives over the screen". - baseballhistorian.com

Image:SamCrawford.jpg

* Samuel Earl Crawford (April 18, 1880 – June 15, 1968), nicknamed "Wahoo Sam", was a Major League Baseball player who played outfield for the Cincinnati Reds and Detroit Tigers. He batted and threw left-handed, standing 6'0" tall and weighing 190 pounds. He was one of the greatest sluggers of the deadball era and still holds the Major League records for triples in a career (309) and for inside-the-park home runs in a season (12) and a career (51). He finished his career with 2,961 hits and a .309 batting average, and was the first player to lead both the American League and the National League in home runs (1901 and 1908). Crawford was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1957 and was featured in Lawrence Ritter’s oral history of the Deadball era, “The Glory of Their Times,” published in 1966.

Baseball legend, Ed Barrow, who managed Crawford in his first two years with Detroit, and went on to convert Babe Ruth to an outfielder as general manager of the Yankees, once said that “there never was a better hitter” than Crawford.” Samuel Earl Crawford (April 18, 1880 – June 15, 1968), nicknamed "Wahoo Sam", was a Major League Baseball player who played outfield for the Cincinnati Reds and Detroit Tigers. He batted and threw left-handed, standing 6'0" tall and weighing 190 pounds. He was one of the greatest sluggers of the deadball era and still holds the Major League records for triples in a career (309) and for inside-the-park home runs in a season (12) and a career (51). He finished his career with 2,961 hits and a .309 batting average, and was the first player to lead both the American League and the National League in home runs (1901 and 1908). Crawford was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1957 and was featured in Lawrence Ritter’s oral history of the Deadball era, “The Glory of Their Times,” published in 1966.

Baseball legend, Ed Barrow, who managed Crawford in his first two years with Detroit, and went on to convert Babe Ruth to an outfielder as general manager of the Yankees, once said that “there never was a better hitter” than Crawford.” One of his contemporaries, Fielder Jones, said of Crawford: “None of them can hit quite as hard as Crawford. He stands up at the plate like a brick house and he hits all the pitchers, without playing favorites.”

Crawford was among the American League leaders in hits, RBIs, extra base hits, slugging percentage, and total bases every year for twelve consecutive years from 1905-1915. Using the “Gray Ink Test,” which awards points based on how often a player is among the league batting leaders, Crawford ranks as the 9th best hitter of all time.

One of his contemporaries, Fielder Jones, said of Crawford: “None of them can hit quite as hard as Crawford. He stands up at the plate like a brick house and he hits all the pitchers, without playing favorites.”

Crawford was among the American League leaders in hits, RBIs, extra base hits, slugging percentage, and total bases every year for twelve consecutive years from 1905-1915. Using the “Gray Ink Test,” which awards points based on how often a player is among the league batting leaders, Crawford ranks as the 9th best hitter of all time.

Sam Crawford

MLB debut
September 10, 1899
for the Cincinnati Reds
Final game
September 16, 1917
for the Detroit Tigers
Career statistics
AVG     .309
Hits     2961
RBI     1525
Teams
  • Cincinnati Reds (1899-1902)
  • Detroit Tigers (1903-1917)
Career highlights and awards
  • All-time leader in triples with 309
  • Led NL in home runs in 1901 with 16 and AL in 1908 with 7
  • Led AL in runs in 1907 with 102
  • Led AL in doubles in 1909 with 35
  • Led NL in triples in 1902 and 1903 and the AL in 1910 and 1913-1915
  • Led AL in RBI's in 1910, 1914, and 1915
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1957
Election Method     Veteran's Committee

* - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia